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Job: MetroStar Systems, New Media Producer (focus on public diplomacy)

Are you passionate about communications and outreach through digital and traditional means? If so, our searchlight is on and seeking a talented New Media Producer to join our esteemed growing team.

Responsibilities:

Plan, coordinate and implement Public Diplomacy programs for audiences throughout Europe
Uses a variety of digital platforms and technology
Works with program managers, marketing specialists, and other producers
Qualifications:

BA or higher in Communications, International Affairs/Relations, or Public Affairs/Public Diplomacy.
Must have excellent oral and written communication skills, with a professional demeanor.
Must be a self-starter and demonstrate initiative.
Ability to work on multiple projects in a fast-paced environment.
Experience in developing and editing content for publication in both digital and print formats.
An eagle eye for quality assurance (editing and requirements review).
Interest in leveraging social media to create a viral buzz for clients.
Working knowledge of social media and webinar platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, USTREAM, Adobe Connect, and Watchitoo.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.
3-5 years' experience in public relations, communications, or related field.

For more info, and to apply, visit: http://www.metrostarsystems.com/careers/available-careers?jvi=.

This material cross posted from Peace & Collaborative Development Network.

Job: Program Assistant, Open Society Foundations, Washington, D.C.

Start Date
As soon as possible

Department
Advocacy

Office
Open Society Foundations-Washington, D.C.

Location
Washington DC

Program Assistant
The Open Society Foundations work to build vibrant and tolerant societies whose governments are accountable and open to the participation of all people.

We seek to strengthen the rule of law; respect for human rights, minorities, and a diversity of opinions; democratically elected governments; and a civil society that helps keep government power in check.

We help to shape public policies that assure greater fairness in political, legal, and economic systems and safeguard fundamental rights.

We implement initiatives to advance justice, education, public health, and independent media.

We build alliances across borders and continents on issues such as corruption and freedom of information.

Working in every part of the world, the Open Society Foundations place a high priority on protecting and improving the lives of people in marginalized communities.

The OSF Washington Office conducts direct advocacy on a broad range of international and domestic issues, including human rights, civil liberties, drug policy, minority rights, public health, education, judicial independence, government transparency and criminal justice reform.

Purpose of Position
Provide administrative and programmatic support to support assigned OSF initiatives. Work is carried out under general supervision.

Essential Duties & Responsibilities
Essential duties and responsibilities include the following. OSF may add, change, or remove essential and other duties at any time.

Administrative and programmatic support

Provide administrative support to a senior policy analyst and communications officer;
Draft/edit routine correspondence and memoranda as required;
Attend meetings, conferences and other relevant events and report as requested;
Prepare drafting of honorarium letters and expense payment agreements;
Assist in preparing the annual budget submission department-data and narrative and work with projects to ensure its accuracy;
Perform clerical duties, including: responding to incoming calls and requests from the general public; faxing and photocopying; preparing expense reports; and generally assist in program administration;
Assist in scheduling meetings, appointments, calls, and travel arrangements for staff, including coordinating with conference organizers;
Maintain and update working files and databases.
Organize logistics of meetings and workshops (travel arrangements, materials, minutes, meeting room set-ups, order food, break down after meetings);
Provide general administrative support such as answering front desk telephones, assisting with visitors;
Assist with office-wide activities as requested;
Process and track various reimbursements and payment accounts;
Reconcile American Express statements;
Liaise with Director of Administration, OSI-Washington, OSI-NY and other partners on administration issues;
Perform other duties as assigned.
Education / Experience

Bachelor's degree from a four-year college or university, and one to three years of relevant experience or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience.
NGO or foundation experience/interest in human rights preferred.
Skills Required

Excellent written, verbal, organizational, analytical and interpersonal skills;
Excellent computer skills, proficient in Microsoft Office;
Excellent listening and communication skills with sensitivity to cultural communication differences;
Show discretion and ability to handle confidential issues;
High level of self-motivation and at ease working independently when necessary;
Poised, works well under pressure and attentive to detail;
Flexibility and willingness to work simultaneously on a wide range of tasks and projects and ability to prioritize tasks;
Pleasant, diplomatic manner and disposition in interacting with senior management, co-workers and the general public.
Program Specific Requirements

Knowledge of human rights issues and instruments, social and other media trends, writing, blog postings, and updating websites.
Demonstrated concern for social justice issues.
Familiarity with legislative processes.
Work Environment and Physical Demands
Essential functions are typically performed in an office setting with a low level of noise. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

Compensation
Commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits package.

Application Instructions
Please email resume and cover letter with salary requirements before May 17, 2013, to: HumanResources(at)opensocietyfoundations.org. Include job code in subject line: PA-DC.

For more info, visit: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/jobs/program-assistant-1?utm_source=twitterfeed&am.


This material cross posted from Peace & Collaborative Development Network.

Event: UI & VU Summer School: Understanding Disability and Rehabilitation in the context of Development, 8 - 25 July 2013

UI & VU Summer School

Understanding Disability and Rehabilitation in the context of Development.

This course is equal to 6 credits and will be held on 8 - 25 July 2013.

Format and Purpose

The Summer School on Disability and Development (D&D) is both a standalone course and the 2nd module in a series on Disability and Development. The Summer School is a collaborative undertaking between the Centre for Disability Studies, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, UI, Faculty of Public Health, UI, and the Athena Institute, Faculty of Earth & Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam (VUA). The course focuses on specific issues related to disability and community-based rehabilitation in the context of development.

Faculty Coordinators
Prof. Irwanto, PhD (UI)
Wim H. van Brakel, MD MSc PhD (VUA)

Lecturers
Maya Thomas, MA PhD
Wim H. van Brakel, MD MSc PhD
Irwanto, PhD
Iwan Ariawan, MD MSPH
Prof. Frieda Simangunsong
Prof. Hadi Pratomo
Laurike Moeliono, MA MSi
Mimi M. Lusli, MSi, MA
And others

Learning Objectives

To develop skills needed for policy, planning and (project) management related to disability, rehabilitation and development
To develop knowledge and skills to monitor and evaluate rehabilitation programmes
To understand the importance of Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) as an appropriate model of rehabilitation for low-income countries
To develop an understanding of the position of specific groups of disabled people in society, such as women and children and be able to develop appropriate interventions for such vulnerable groups
To acquire skills and knowledge in advocacy, lobbying and networking
To acquire facilitation skills necessary for implementation of participatory project development
To understand the importance of forming partnerships with Disabled People's Organisations
To gain an understanding and appreciation for inclusive development approaches, with a specific focus on education and employment opportunities

Content

The Summer School on Disability and Development (D&D) focuses on specific issues related to disability and rehabilitation in the context of development. The course will provide the student with skills in the field of project planning and management using a logical framework method. It offers the student opportunities to go through and practice the entire process of project management through experiential learning. Another major subject will be monitoring and evaluation methods, currently used in the field of CBR programmes. The importance and use of Management Information Systems (MIS) will be discussed in some detail, since this is a cornerstone of good monitoring and evaluation. Students will practice setting up a simple MIS themselves.

In-dept knowledge will be gained about CBR as a preferred approach and methodology for disability and rehabilitation in low- and middle-income countries and students will learn to critically review and analyse the existing and more recent literature on CBR. Attention will be paid to human resource issues such as planning and capacity building, The importance of organisational and institutional development will be discussed; i.e., the role of inter-sectoral collaboration; networking and empowerment for advocacy and lobby roles of rehabilitation programmes.

The rise and development of the rights movement and of Disabled Peoples Organisations and their importance as partners will be reviewed. Their role in planning and delivery of services will get ample attention. Emphasis is placed on vulnerable groups among the disabled population: i.e. women; the elderly and children. Educational and economic empowerment will be discussed and a critical analysis will be made of specific forms of education and economic empowerment, such as inclusive education, the role of micro-finance; the role of vocational institutes and sheltered employment. Affirmative action and legislative measures will be reviewed in the field of education and employment.

Finally, the student will be exposed to the role and position of various more specific services and interventions in the field of rehabilitation, including the role of rehabilitation professionals and the important area of sports and disability.


For more information, please visit: http://www.summerondisability.com/

This material cross posted from Peace & Collaborative Development Network.

Justice and Peace Advocacy Internship (Washington, DC) - Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach

The Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach (CCAO), an international Catholic social justice organization, is based in Silver Spring, MD. We are just one stop up the red line from Washington, DC. The CCAO staff and interns spend a significant amount of time attending meetings, hearings, and briefings on Capitol Hill. The Justice and Peace Advocacy Intern will support and assist the Advocacy Associate with advocacy and education projects for 10-15 hours a week related to his/her assigned issue area and assigned countries.

Internship Objectives:

1. Monitor assigned issue area such as environmental issues, economic justice and trade policy, immigration/ migration and human trafficking, or peace and conflict resolution in countries where Columbans serve.

2. Analyze policies of the US government and international financial institutions in countries where Columbans serve, with a particular concern for their effects on those who live in poverty and on the environment.

3. Educate our office's grassroots base regarding the above issues and concerns through social media and our publications.

4. Collaborate with other non profits or faith-based working groups related to our priority issues.

Essential Job Functions:

1. Monitor his/her issue, country assignements and pertinent legislation

2. Write letters to decision makers concerning his/her issue and region.

3. As directed, make appointments with Congressional staffers and other decision makers, present the Columban's advocacy position at appointments and follow up with necessary materials.

4. Attend working group meetings for assigned issue areas as able.

5. Write reports on meetings and events attended.

6. Develop educational materials for the CCAO newsletter and other publications as needed.

7. Occasionally, assist with administrative tasks.

8. Write blogs and facebook posts on issue and internship experiences.

For more info, and to apply, visit: http://columban.org/2491/columban-center-for-advocacy-and-outreach/get-involved/ccao-advocacy-internship/


This material cross posted from Peace and Collaborative Development Network.

Media/Advocacy Internship (Washington, DC) - The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS)

Over the last two years, the conflict in Syria has taken 70,000 lives, caused over 1 million refugees to flee their homes, and displaced more than 2.5 million people. Many call Syria the most complex humanitarian crisis they have ever seen.

The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) is a humanitarian organization of Syrian-American medical professionals committed to saving lives and alleviating suffering in crises worldwide. Our current major focus of humanitarian relief operations is in Syria and neighboring countries. We need your help to raise awareness for the plight of Syrian refugees and displaced people, and help get them the type of humanitarian assistance that saves lives.

A SAMS' internship is a great way to gain valuable skills and experience in public policy on humanitarian relief, emergency response, issues facing refugees and vulnerable populations and advocacy campaigns, and to deepen your understanding of issues facing the Middle East.

Responsibilities

• Researching and tracking legislation as it relates to humanitarian assistance and other issues in Syria and the Middle East;
• Tracking American media coverage of issues related to SAMS and the Middle East;
• Drafting fact sheets, correspondence, talking points, and other external communications;
• Supporting the implementation of a media and communications strategy dedicated to addressing the US audience, including disseminating information to media as well as civil society and non-governmental entities;
• Supporting the drafting, preparation and presentation of materials required for briefings to Congress, Congressional staffers, the media and other governmental and non-governmental agencies in the Washington, DC or broader US setting;
• Supporting efforts to build and sustain partnerships with international organizations headquartered in the US;
• Attending Congressional hearings, briefings and other special events both on the Hill and within the broader NGO and think tank community;
• Drafting memos to headquarters regarding legislation, hearings, and other developments in Congress and in international policy on Syria;
• Researching general issues related to the intersection between the United States and SAMS' operations in the Middle East;
• Research human rights issues of women, children and refugees as background for community outreach and new campaign launches;
• Design and write promotional materials in a variety of media;
• Experienced interns may have the opportunity to launch their own humanitarian advocacy campaigns;
• Post blog entries and other social media updates about humanitarian aid related activities, events, issues and programs

Learning Objectives
• Students will learn effective community outreach techniques
• Students will learn methods of engaging media to highlight refugee programs and humanitarian and medical relief projects
• Students will learn effective writing strategies for advocacy

Requirements
• Graduate student preferred
• Strong research, writing and communication skills, including ability to articulate policy positions and recommendations
• Strong computer skills
• Willingness to learn about SAMS' mission, vision and programs
• Ability to act independently and energetically on all tasks
• Discretion, maturity, ability to maintain confidentiality
• Ability to set a regular internship schedule (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) (at least 20 hours per week for Fall and Spring internships)
• Sound appreciation of regional context and strong general understanding of US foreign policy as it relates to the Middle East, as well as genuine commitment to advocacy for the humanitarian positions that underpin SAMS' mission;
• Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in English
• Fluency in Arabic is preferred, but not required

How to Apply
Send a cover letter explaining what you aim to achieve from a SAMS internship, brief writing sample (no more than 5 pages) and resume to info(at)sams-usa.net
Please include the subject line "Media/Advocacy Intern"

This material cross posted from Peace and Collaborative Development Network.

HHH students Amevor, Clancy & Winger discussing Global Policy Capstone Monday, May 6

Interested in registering for a global policy capstone?

Come join us to discuss our experience with the University of Minnesota Extension Global Capstone Project!

May 6th, 2013, 12:30--1:30pm Freeman Commons

FREE SNACKS!

This project focused on the creation of tools and resources which will be used to internationalize Extension curriculum. We will be discussing our process and deliverables, including; case studies, a short video and a PowerPoint presentation. For more information on University of Minnesota Extension, please visit www.extension.umn.edu Extension Capstone Discussion Flyer.docx

Ameido Amevor, MPP
Kevin Clancy, MPA
Rachael Winger, MPP

HHH community: Freeman-Stassen Award for International Activities

The Freeman-Stassen Award is given to the Humphrey student who has demonstrated the greatest achievement in the field of global affairs. The award jointly is presented by the Freeman and Stassen chairs.

Nominations are due May 7, 2013.

Eligibility + selection

The purpose of this award is to challenge Humphrey School graduate students to excel in international activities. To that end the Freeman and Stassen Centers jointly offer a $500 award to a student or students who achieve excellence in international activities during their program at the Humphrey School. This award may be given for the following kinds of activities:

Institutional innovation at the Humphrey School that helps strengthen the School's global programs
A professional paper that addresses an international problem;
A paper done as a part of coursework in the School or done independently of formal course work; or
Fieldwork done in an internship as part of the student's regular degree program.

The criteria for evaluating the submissions include (1) academic rigor, (2) institutional innovation, (3) creativity, (4) contribution to policy design and implementation, and (5) contribution to the Institute and its programs. Nominations for the award must be made by the student's advisor with a brief statement (one page) of support. Students are encouraged to suggest their work to their advisors for possible submission. Advisors can submit more than one nomination.

Nominations will be judged by a committee of three faculty members who have substantial international involvement and/or experience. Awards may be given to two or more students. An award will not be given if a nomination of exceptional quality is not forthcoming. The decision of those judging the awards will be final.
To apply

A student must be nominated by his or her faculty advisor. Advisors will submit a brief, one page letter of support for the nomination. Advisors can submit more than one nomination. Students are encouraged to suggest their nomination to their adivser. Nominations are due May 7, 2013. Please email nominations to Sherry Gray at grayx260(at)umn.edu.

USAID Careers- Coffee with Madeline Williams - May 15, 11 AM, Room 280B

Take a study break and talk about USAID careers!

Dear HHH Students: Interested in learning what it is like to have a career in international development through USAID?

Join us for a casual conversation with alumna Madeline Williams, who has enjoyed more than 15 years of development experience in Latin America, the Middle East and other areas, through her work as a USAID Foreign Service Officer.

Wednesday, May 15 11:00 AM
Room 280B Humphrey Center (inside the Student Services Office)

Coffee and treats will be served.

RSVP to Lynne at schum001(at)umn.edu by Tuesday, May 14 (so we know how many treats to get).

2013-2014 Applications for Sasakawa Peace Foundation Fellowships for mid-career professionals--Apply by May 10

Deadline Extended - 2013-2014 Applications for Sasakawa Peace Foundation Fellowships

Pacific Forum CSIS has extended the deadline for the 2013-2014 of resident Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) Fellowships to Friday, May 10.

The SPF Fellowship was created in 2010 to nurture early- to mid-career academics and professionals from a wide range of backgrounds who are committed to broadening and strengthening the US-Japan alliance - one of the Asia-­Pacific's most critical security relationships. Previous experience studying or researching the alliance is not required; the fellowship is designed to bring in fresh perspectives and engage researchers who have not previously considered this crucial security relationship.

The fellowship provides an unparalleled opportunity to not only research the alliance, but to work with Pacific Forum's extensive global network of government, business, and academic contacts in developing concrete policy solutions. Fellows have the freedom to work on alliance-related topics of their choice, ranging from traditional military security issues to emerging threats such as cyber and biosecurity.

In addition to the time spent in Honolulu, US fellows spend up to six weeks in Tokyo and Japanese fellows spend up to six weeks in Washington, DC. Fellows also have the opportunity participate in select Young Leaders conferences and programs throughout the world, as relevant to their research interests.

To assist with their cost-of-living expenses, fellows are provided a USD 3,000 stipend. By the conclusion of the fellowship, fellows are expected to have produced an article for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Graduates of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation fellowship program have transitioned into career success at many levels, including positions in government, the private sector, and academia.

Candidates should be in their late 20s to late 30s and possess a master's degree or be in pursuit of a PhD, with several years of professional experience. Candidates must also be able to commit to their fellowship for six months.

If you know the name and contact information of a promising candidate, please email Program Officer Brooke Mizuno, and she will send them application information.

For more information and to apply, visit http://csis.org/program/spf-fellowship.

The application deadline is now Friday, May 10 2013 and the successful fellows will begin in the summer or early fall.

Pacific Forum CSIS

Perspectives on Global Food Security and Social Justice: A Roundtable Discussion

May 8, 2013
3:30-5:00pm
180 Humphrey Center

Please join us for a discussion of global food security and social justice on themes including:
- How do we meet the challenges of global food security and long-term environmental sustainability?
- How is the global food system evolving and what are some implications for Africa and for small farmers? What are some strategies for addressing the food insecurity of the poorest of the poor?
- What are some different ways of understanding global food security and how do these understandings map onto thinking about food justice?
- How do questions of food security and social justice fit in the context of India's economic growth story?

The new Global Spotlight Grants Program focused on global food security and South Asia will also be announced. Event sponsored by ICGC and Global Spotlight Program of the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance.

Remarks by:

Jonathan Foley, Director, Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota

William Moseley, Professor and Chair of Geography, Macalester College

Rachel Schurman, Professor, Institute for Global Studies and Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota

Vinay Gidwani, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Environment & Society and the Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

Moderator: Valentine Cadieux, Research Associate, Departments of Sociology and Geography, Society and Environment, University of Minnesota

Refreshments will be served.

May 6: Professor Peter Andreas on "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"

Lippincott Room, SS 1314, on Monday May 6th from 3:30-5pm.

We are very pleased to announce that on Monday, May 6th, MIRC, together with the Harold E. Stassen Chair at the Humphrey Institute, and the department of Political Science, is proud to host a distinguished speaker, Peter Andreas, Professor of Political Science and International Relations at Brown University.

Peter Andreas will be presenting a talk based on his newly launched book, "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America." An abstract is below, and the poster attached.

Please feel free to disseminate this announcement to any who might be interested. All are welcome!

This talk has been generously sponsored by the Harold E. Stassen Chair and the Department of Political Science.


About "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"
America is a smuggler nation. Our long history of illicit imports has ranged from West Indies molasses and Dutch gunpowder in the 18th century, to British industrial technologies and African slaves in the 19th century, to French condoms and Canadian booze in the early 20th century, to Mexican workers and Colombian cocaine in the modern era. Contraband capitalism, it turns out, has been an integral part of American capitalism.

Providing a sweeping narrative history from colonial times to the present, Smuggler Nation is the first book to retell the story of America--and of its engagement with its neighbors and the rest of the world--as a series of highly contentious battles over clandestine commerce. As Peter Andreas demonstrates in this provocative and fascinating account, smuggling has played a pivotal and too often overlooked role in America's birth, westward expansion, and economic development, while anti-smuggling campaigns have dramatically enhanced the federal government's policing powers. The great irony, Andreas tells us, is that a country that was born and grew up through smuggling is today the world's leading anti-smuggling crusader.

May 3: Professor Tarak Barkawi on "States, Armies and Empires: Armed Forces and Society in World Politics"

The Colloquium will meet from 1:30-3:00 in the Lippincott
Room (Social Sciences Tower 1314)

The Minnesota Political Theory Colloquium is proud to present Professor Tarak Barkawi from the Department of Politics at the New School for Social Research. Tarak is an alumnus of the Political Science program at U of M and significantly contributes to critical international relations theory and strategic studies. Tarak will be presenting his paper, "States, Armies and Empires: Armed Forces and Society in World Politics," with discussion to follow. His paper can be downloaded here: states.armies.empires.2013-2.pdf.

Coffee will be served. All are welcome.

Please join us for this wonderful discussion, also co-sponsored by ICGC, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change & The Humphrey School.

Summer 2013 Confucius Institute Chinese Language Classes

The weather may suggest otherwise, but it's time to register for summer 2013 classes! The ten-week semester will start on June 10, 2013 and run through August 22, 2013. There will be no classes the week of July 1 for Independence Day.

To register for classes, please use our registration form. The registration deadline is Friday, May 31, 2013. For questions about course offerings or registration, please contact Emily Ruskin at ecruskin(at)umn.edu.


Course Offerings

Beginning Chinese I
Beginning Chinese I is a course designed for beginners with no prior knowledge of Chinese language. This course offers an introduction to reading, listening, speaking, and writing in Chinese. Students will practice accurate pronunciation and tones, learn basic grammar structures, and learn to recognize about 180 characters. By the end of the session, students will be able to exchange basic personal information, initiate and respond to greetings and conduct basic conversations. Learn more about Beginning Chinese I.

Class day/time: Tuesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 11 - August 20, 2013

Beginning Chinese II
Beginning Chinese II allows students who successfully completed Beginning Chinese I at the Confucius Institute, or those at a similar level, to continue to work on reading, listening, speaking, and writing Chinese. By the end of the session, students will be able to initiate simple requests, and give a simple and basic description of a person, a place, or an object.Learn more about Beginning Chinese II.

Class day/time: Mondays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 10 - August 19, 2013

Beginning Chinese III
Beginning Chinese III allows students who successfully completed Beginning Chinese II at the Confucius Institute, or those who have a similar level of Chinese, to continue to work on reading, listening, speaking, and writing Chinese. In this course students will learn new sentence structures and increase vocabulary. By the end of the session, students will be able to conduct more in-depth conversations on everyday topics, and express basic attitudes and emotions. Learn more about Beginning Chinese III.

Class day/time: Wednesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 12 - August 21, 2013

Intermediate Chinese I
This class allows students who have successfully completed the Beginning Chinese series at the Confucius Institute, or those who have a similar level of Chinese, to improve their ability to communicate in Chinese. In this course students will continue to work on reading, listening, speaking, and writing Chinese with a focus on using a wider vocabulary to describe things, using complex sentences, and understanding expressions of time, including past, present, and future tenses. Students will increase their vocabulary to more than 500 characters. By the end of the session students will improve their conversational ability and be able to describe common things, events, and experiences verbally and in writing. Learn more about Intermediate Chinese I.

Class day/time: Mondays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 10 - August 19, 2013
Intermediate Chinese II
Advance your study of Chinese at the intermediate level. This class allows students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese I at the Confucius Institute, or those who have a similar level of Chinese, to improve their ability to communicate in Chinese. Learn more about Intermediate Chinese II.

Class day/time: Tuesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 11 - August 20, 2013

Intermediate Chinese III
This class allows students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at the Confucius Institute, or those who have a similar level of Chinese, to improve their ability to communicate in Chinese. In this class, students continue to improve language skills in speaking, reading, writing and listening through more in-depth discussion on social communicative topics, such as living in a new place, describing a trip, and student life. By the end of the course, students will have learned to describe events in the past, present, and future by using the proper adverbs indicating time.Learn more about Intermediate Chinese III.

Class day/time: Wednesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Semester dates: June 12 - August 21, 2013

Chinese Rehab
This is an instructor-led conversation group for adults who want to restore their Chinese language skills. If you have lived in China or studied Chinese in the past, this group can help you revive your "zhongwen." Participants should be at the intermediate level or higher and come to each class prepared to participate in the conversation. Learn more about Chinese Rehab.

Class day/time: Wednesdays, 6:00 - 7:00 pm
Semester dates: June 12 - August 21, 2013

Unsure which course is best for you?
Take one of our placement tests and send it in. One of our instructors will assess your results and help you choose the class best suited to your abilities. Placement tests can be found on our website under each corresponding course level.

Registration

To register for classes, please use our registration form (class_registration.pdf) and review our policy on class cancellations and refunds. The registration deadline is Friday, May 31, 2013. Classes fill quickly, so register early to guarantee your spot. For questions about course offerings or registration, please contact Emily Ruskin at ecruskin(at)umn.edu.

Vote for HHH students competing in international food security competition- Thought for Food 2013

Thought for Food is a movement dedicated to tackling the global challenge of feeding 9 billion people through bold, breakthrough solutions.

It is comprised of some of the best and brightest minds of the next generation, driven by a desire to invigorate innovation and uproot the status quo.

They run an annual competition to catalyze university students from all fields of study to learn more about the complex challenges surrounding food security, and inspire them to channel their passions and creativity towards developing new ideas that make a difference.

HHH students Justin Anderson, Sahar Angadjivand, Prabin Bajgain, Yong Bao, & Patrick Ewing are competing with a project focused on empowering cooperative farming. More info on their project & the opportunity to vote for them can be found at: http://tffchallenge.com/team/9-billion-networks/

Job: Program Officer, Global Development and Population, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Menlo Park, California

Program Officer, Global Development and Population

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, based in Menlo Park, California, seeks a Program Officer for the Global Development and Population Program.

About the Foundation
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been making grants since 1967 to help solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. The Foundation concentrates its resources on activities in education, the environment, global development and population, performing arts, and philanthropy, and makes grants to support disadvantaged communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Foundation's assets are more than $7.5 billion, with annual awards of grants and gifts totaling over $350 million. A thirteen member Board of Directors provides overall direction for the Foundation. For more information about the Foundation, please visit www.hewlett.org.

About the Global Development and Population Program
The Global Development and Population Program make grants to improve the well-being of vulnerable people. In developing countries, this grantmaking focuses on promoting women's empowerment, including through expanded access to high quality reproductive health care; and on promoting transparent, accountable governance to deliver social services. The program also makes grants to strengthen the capacity of research-based organizations, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, to collect and use data. The Global Development and Population Program team currently consists of nineteen staff, including eleven Program Officers.

About the Position
The new Program Officer will report to Ruth Levine, Program Director, and work collaboratively with other Program Officers and Program Associates. A particular focus of this position will be on the generation, use, and communication of data to inform and influence policy decisions and to improve accountable governance. Specific roles and responsibilities include:

Participate in strategic planning for grantmaking related to research capacity, transparency and accountability.
Maintain current knowledge of trends, practices, technology applications, and other related aspects of the Program field.
Review and assess grantee proposals in light of Program strategies.
Provide assistance to grantees and other parties in the field.
Draft proposal summaries for Board consideration and discretionary awards.
Develop and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues in the Foundation's headquarters, and with diverse groups of professionals and professional organizations, foundations, and funding sources.
Make site visits, attend conferences, and represent Foundation programs to the public and to leaders in the Program area.
Evaluate grants and Program initiatives and respond to annual grantee reports.
Contribute to the Foundation's interest in and practice of strategic philanthropy, including due diligence, goal setting, review of business plans, knowledge building, and evaluation.
Represent the Foundation's programs to a variety of external entities.
Guide potential grantees through the Foundation's proposal process, including its compliance-related procedures.
Organize Foundation-sponsored meetings of grantees and field experts.
The Program Officer's responsibilities involve working with a broad array of collaborators, including grantees, multi and bilateral donors and civil society organizations. Ideally, the Program Officer will possess knowledge of relevant international social and economic development issues. The Program Officer should bring a deep understanding of African contexts; a demonstrated track record of building and fostering sustainable partnerships at the regional and international level; an ability to work with advocacy organizations in the collection and use of data to inform key policy making actions; a strong methodological and analytical capacity; and an abundance of energy and intellectual curiosity.

Moreover, the Program Officer should possess exceptional interpersonal skills and a capacity to work in highly collaborative teams comprising colleagues as well as individuals in government, private-sector, and international institutions; public policy organizations; think tanks; and academic institutions engaged in the international arena.

The Program Officer should ideally possess the following professional qualifications and personal attributes:

Qualifications

Advanced degree in development economics, population science, or related discipline.
Knowledge and appreciation of transparency and accountability issues and actors, as well as issues related to the generation and use of data for research, for policy formulation and for monitoring government performance in developing countries.
Knowledge and appreciation of approaches to mobilize citizen participation and catalyze citizen feedback a plus.
Applied knowledge of social science methodologies in research design, data collection and quantification, modeling, and analysis.
Relevant grantmaking experience, preferably including designing and implementing strategies, developing budgets, and managing portfolios.
Demonstrated success mobilizing and working with multilateral and development organizations, foundations, other nonprofit entities, and academia, as well as government officials and technical personnel in developing countries.
Excellent writing skills and capacity to distill complex ideas in simple language, both verbally and in writing.
Personal Attributes

Deep commitment to the values and mission of the Hewlett Foundation and to the vision and goals of its Global Development and Population Program.
Ability and flexibility to travel extensively.
French language skills and work experience in Africa strongly preferred.
Exceptional ability to articulate and realize a vision, to motivate others, and to work collaboratively with a high-caliber team of staff and external partners.
Capacity to learn from experience, to adapt as needed, to generate new and practical ideas, to listen, and to work with others to shape emerging issues.
Excellent organizational skills, with a demonstrated track record of consistently meeting deadlines.
Natural talent for bridging differences, finding common ground, and building relationships with people at all levels of society.
Capacity to communicate persuasively, orally and in writing, in a range of settings.
Clear personal integrity and sense of humility.
Compensation and Benefits
The Hewlett Foundation offers an excellent benefits package and a salary commensurate with experience and education. This position is exempt and full-time.

To Apply
Please email your resume and cover letter detailing your interest in this position to Daniel Sherman, President, Explore Company: resumes(at)explorecompany.com. Please refer to PO/HF in the Subject line. No phone inquiries please.

More info at: http://www.hewlett.org/about-us/careers/global-development-and-population-program-officer/program-officer-global-development-and-population

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation is an equal opportunity employer and welcome a diverse pool of candidates for this search.

The Foundation uses an outside firm to check the accuracy of information supplied by applicants.

This material cross posted from Peace & Collaborative Development Network.

Chavanne Peercy Awarded Fulbright Grant

Chavanne Peercy has been awarded a Teaching/Research grant through the Fulbright Scholar Program for the academic year 2013-2014. She will spend her time in Guinea as a visiting faculty member at the University of Conakry where she will teach two graduate level courses on development. Her research focuses on the current political transition in Guinea, and specifically the ways in which various levels of local leadership influence the process.

Perspectives on Global Food Security and Social Justice: A Roundtable Discussion

May 8, 2013 3:30-5:00pm
180 Humphrey Center

Please join us for a discussion of global food security and social justice on themes including:

- How do we meet the challenges of global food security and long-term environmental sustainability?
- How is the global food system evolving and what are some implications for Africa and for small farmers? What are some strategies for addressing the food insecurity of the poorest of the poor?
- What are some different ways of understanding global food security and how do these understandings map onto thinking about food justice?
- How do questions of food security and social justice fit in the context of India's economic growth story?

The new Global Spotlight Grants Program focused on global food security and South Asia will also be announced. Event sponsored by ICGC and Global Spotlight Program of the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance.

Remarks by:

Jonathan Foley, Director, Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota

William Moseley, Professor and Chair of Geography, Macalester College

Rachel Schurman, Professor, Institute for Global Studies and Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota

Vinay Gidwani, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Environment & Society and the Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

Moderator: Valentine Cadieux, Research Associate, Departments of Sociology and Geography, Society and Environment, University of Minnesota

Refreshments will be served.

Why You Must Know The Differences Between Sunni and Shiah Muslims: Publicizing what Islam REALLY teaches

Why You Must Know The Differences Between Sunni and Shiah Muslims
Publicizing what Islam REALLY teaches

islamicmediamn(at)gmail.com islamicmediamn.org
Sat. May 11, 2013
12:00-3:15

3 life-changing hours

Please RSVP

Ridgedale Regional Center Robert H. Rohlf Room 12601 Ridgedale Dr. Minnetonka, MN 55305

Enjoy a free boxed lunch from Holy Land; vegetarian or halal meat options; let us know your preference We regret we cannot accommodate young children.
The event is free to people who are not Muslim. If you are a Muslim and want to attend, kindly ask us first.

Odeh Muhawesh is a respected theologian, captivating speaker, brilliant teacher, and wildly successful entrepreneur who has humbly dedicated his life to seeking
knowledge with a divine aim and inspiring others to do the same. He composes his moving, knowledge-packed, scripture-backed speeches on the way to an event itself, and each speech is worthy of being recorded for broadcast publication.

Please join us for an eye-opening speech about the differences between Sunni Muslims and Shiah Muslims, a Q & A time, and a delicious free lunch. Ask ANY question about Islam--Mr. Muhawesh loves any question.

Please RSVP to islamicmediamn(at)gmail.com by May 9th, 2013.

What previous event attendees had to say:
"Simply excellent!"
"People only hear negative little blitzes in the news, and they don't have the right information."
"I felt you could ask any question you wanted."
"I'm glad I was able to ask basic questions about Islamic theology and history without feeling silly or out of place."
"Each of us who comes to these events needs to take the information back to their own groups and correct the wrong information that is out there."

Preparing Global Leaders Institute 11-24 August, Struga and Skopje, Macedonia

Preparing Global Leaders Institute (http://pglinstitute.org)

Preparing Global Leaders Institute (PGLI) is created to train new generations for effective and ethical leadership, prepared to act as global leaders in addressing world's problems.

Participants learn through intensive engagement in classes, debates, simulations - all involving future national and international leaders from different countries, cultures, religions and races.

The institute is open for young professionals who wish to extend their theoretical knowledge and acquire leadership skills by listening to lectures from eminent professors, diplomats, politicians, directors of regional and international institutes, CEO's etc.

Organized by the Association for Global Development Initiatives - "Third Millennium" and in partnership with FON University, PGLI is proud to welcome three award - winning professors from Georgetown, Oxford and St.Cyril and Methodius , including one of America's best professors according to the renowned Princeton Review, a communications adviser to the world's most prominent leaders and the director of Oxford's Psychology, Physiology, and Philosophy department, to teach courses on the psychology of leadership, public speaking, political economy, diplomacy and foreign policy.

Delegates will then be able to put their instruction into practice through exciting constitutional, diplomatic and business simulations that will foster important leadership skills and help prepare our delegates for real-world
challenges.

Outside of the classroom, PGLI delegates will hear political dignitaries discuss their leadership experiences and have the opportunity to socialize with bright, young, motivated students and professionals from 30+ countries.

Attendees will also benefit from immersion in the host country during an 11-day stay on the beautiful coast of the Lake of Ohrid, a UNESCO heritage site, and through recreational trips to Ohrid, St. Naum, and Bitola.

At the end of our program there will be a graduation ceremony held at the prestigious FON University in Skopje. Upon completion of the institutes our delegates will receive certificates from PGL and FON as future global leaders.

PGLI TOPICS:
Political Persuasion, Cross-cultural Communication, Analytic Thinking, Political Economy, Social media, Journalism, Diplomacy, Personal Branding, Networking, Advertising, Transition Democracy, Psychology of Leadership, Cognition,
Marketing and International Relations

SIMULATION EXERCISES:

Delegates will receive real-time training and guidance from PGL experts and faculty in competitive exercises.

Simulations: parliamentary, diplomatic reporting, diplomatic etiquette, speech-making, business plan writing, and campaign advertising.

SCHOLARSHIP AND PROGRAM COST

Students may apply for scholarships given by PGLI. Scholarships are based on merit, civic involvement, and motivation. Should applicants wish to apply for a scholarship they should enclose a brief scholarship statement to their application.

Self-financed students pay the full cost of the program which is 1000 EUR (covering tuition fees, accommodation, full meal plan, special events, sport facilities, vocational trips, and transportation Struga-Skopje).

All participants are responsible for travel arrangements and associated insurance and VISA costs (if needed) to Macedonia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1InvFGY1AtU

Online Certificates From Tufts University: Humanitarian Assistance & Delivery Science

The Friedman School currently offers the following certificates designed to meet the needs of professionals who wish to deepen their knowledge in order to advance in their careers.

Delivery Science for International Nutrition
Evidence-Based Humanitarian Assistance
Each certificate is made up of three courses. All courses are all taught online by Tufts faculty, and every course is held to the same academic standards and rigor as those taught live on the Boston campus. The certificate takes one year to complete (Fall, Spring, and Summer).

Additionally, both Tufts and the United Nations University confer the certificate in Delivery Science for International Nutrition. Recipients of the certificates receive an enhanced level of recognition by virtue of the standings of both institutions.

The Friedman School also offers certificates in "Healthy Communities" and "Nutrition Communications in addition to a blended-learning (online with intensive residencies) and our seven residential degree programs.

Graduate Certificate Courses and Continuing Education at Friedman

Through advanced teaching pedagogies and robust software platforms, students in our certificate programs are taught fully online over one year through three 16-week semesters. Students are from around the globe and learn from the school's renowned faculty, collaborate and network with fellow students, and receive superior career-advancing instruction on a schedule that fits the demands of today's professionals.

Tufts has mastered the art of distance learning with proven educational experiences that are recognized as being equally as enriching as the traditional classroom. On average, students need 8-12 hours each week to do the work required for each course.

Students who earn certificates will have the ability to apply their courses toward electives at the Friedman School should they decide to pursue a masters degree. (Please consult with the Office of Admissions for full details in applying for individual degree programs).

Admissions

Visit the school's website for full information

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