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Mar 31 Japanese tea ceremony at IAS, UMN 4:30pm

Japanese Tea Ceremony Performance
Fumio Watanabe, Yuriko Watanabe, and tea ceremony students
Monday, March 31, 4:30 p.m., 140 Nolte Center
https://events.umn.edu/034174

All events are free and open to the public. Check http://www.ias.umn.edu/calendar/ for full event listings.

Become a Fan of the IAS on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/IASatUMN
Follow the IAS on Twitter! @IASatUofM
~ Creating intellectual community across and beyond the boundaries of the University ~

Oral History Workshop Friday

Oral History Workshop this Friday. Workshop led by Dominique Tobbell and Barbara Sommer, 1-2:30 p.m.; Panel discussion with Dominique Tobbell, Barbara Sommer, Peter Shea, and Paul Hillmer, 3-4:30 p.m., both in 125 Nolte. More information, including links to oral history interviews, at http://ias.umn.edu/2014/03/28/oral-history/.


All events are free and open to the public. Check http://www.ias.umn.edu/calendar/ for full event listings.
Videos of past events available at http://ias.umn.edu/programs/ias-videos/

Follow the IAS on Twitter! @IASatUofM

~ Creating intellectual community across and beyond the boundaries of the University ~

March 31 TFA Truth Tour: Education, Inequality, & Corporate Education Reform

TEACH FOR AMERICA TRUTH TOUR
Calling all students-- this Monday, March 31st at 5:30pm come learn about the truth behind Teach For America. For many of us who are concerned about inequality in education, TFA seems like an opportunity to make a difference. Yet, as numerous TFA alums and professionals have made it increasingly clear, rather than fighting inequality, TFA actually promotes it.

This event will feature a former TFA corps member who will speak about how TFA failed to prepare them for the classroom, and how TFA perpetuates inequality in our schools and further damages an already broken education system. If you're planning on working with TFA, considering applying, or are interested in issues of education reform and public education, you won't want to miss this event.

WHAT: TFA Truth Tour- featuring a panel of former TFA corps members, local teachers, and experts on education reform

WHEN: Monday, March 31st at 5:30
WHERE: Tate Physics Building room 210

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Amy Perna
Master of Public Policy Candidate, 2014
The Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Registration Now Open: Honoring Choices Across Cultures May 7

Global Health - University of Minnesota, Department of Medicine via
Honoring Choices Across Cultures
Early rate registration available through April 9, 2014

May 7, 2014 @ 7:30a - 5:00p
This event addresses advanced care planning and end of life care across cultures. The morning will consist of didactic lectures, and the afternoon will be devoted to small group simulated patient encounters and tabletop discussions.

This event is a part of the 2014 Live Global Health Course. AMA PRA Category 1 Credits are available*
Complete event and registration information is
available at www.cme.umn.edu/honoring

May 7, 2014 - 7:30am -5:00pm

University of Minnesota
Phillips Wangensteen Building,
516 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN

Early Rate (Before April 9, 2014)
$249 - Medical Industry Personnel
$99 - UMN Resident/Fellow/Student

Regular Rate (After April 9, 2014)
$299 - Medical Industry Personnel
$199 - UMN Resident/Fellow/Student

US Dept of State Pathways Internship Experience Program (IEP) & Internship Temporary Experience Program (ITEP)

We are accepting applications for the U.S. Department of State Pathways Internship Experience Program (IEP) and the Internship Temporary Experience Program (ITEP).

Visit USAJobs to start the online application process and search for the following vacancy announcement numbers. Please note the cutoff number for each position. Applications received after the cutoff number is reached will not reviewed. Therefore, timely submission of applications is important.

IEP Grade Location Cutoff Announcement Number
GS-1199 Realty Specialist 5,7 Washington, DC 50 HRSC/PATH-2014-0077
GS-199 Foreign Affairs 5,7
Washington, DC 100 HRSC/PATH-2014-0079
GS-1499 Librarian 7 Washington, DC 50 HRSC/PATH-2014-0086
ITEP Grade Location Cutoff Announcement Number
GS-1199 Realty Specialist - Seasonal 5,7 Washington, DC 50 HRSC/PATH-2014-0078

The Internship Experience Program (IEP) allows for non-temporary appointments that are expected to last the length of the academic program for which the intern is enrolled. IEP participants, while in the program, are eligible for noncompetitive promotions.

The Internship Temporary Experience Program (ITEP) places interns on temporary appointments not to exceed one year with the possibility of extensions in one-year increments. The temporary nature of ITEP allows for interns to work during seasonal and holiday breaks in academic programs. ITEP participants are ineligible for noncompetitive promotions. If an ITEP participant is qualified at a higher grade level, he/she must compete for the position via a USAJobs vacancy announcement.

Both programs allow for noncompetitive conversion into the competitive service following successful completion of all program requirements. Veteran's preference applies.

Pathways internship opportunities with the U.S. Department of State allow students to witness and participate in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy, and work closely with the U.S. diplomats and civil servants who carry out America's foreign policy initiatives.

We appreciate your interest in a career with the U.S. Department of State.

Visit our forums if you have any questions, or to search for topics of interest. The forums can be found under Engage on the careers.state.gov website. You can also search our FAQs for more information.

U.S. citizenship is required. An equal opportunity employer.

Institute of International Education's 2014 Best Practices Conference website is now live

2014 Best Practices Conference Website is Now Live http://www.iie.org/IIE-Home/Who-We-Are/News-and-Events/Events/2014/Best-Practices-Conference-2014/Multimedia

We invite you to view valuable speaker and panel session videos and download PowerPoint presentations, to help you and your colleagues make the most of the best practices that were featured at the conference. You can also see photos of the events, download the conference program, and download presentations from the pre-conference roundtable sessions. We also encourage you to visit IIE's Best Practices Resource, featuring profiles of all of the current and past winners of the annual Andrew Heiskell Awards for Innovation in International Education, along with honorable mention and special recognition recipients - an impressive archive of nearly 100 program examples to inspire you and your campus leadership.

IIE's Best Practices in Internationalizing the Campus Conference, March 13-14, 2014

The IIE Best Practices Conference on March 14 at IIE's headquarters in New York City featured presentations by university provosts, deans, and government officials who shared their strategies and achievements for internationalizing their respective campuses. The Opening Keynote speaker was Marianne Craven, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Winners of the 2014 Andrew Heiskell Awards for Innovation in International Education discussed their programs, all of which contribute to the internationalization of higher education in the United States and abroad.

Panel sessions included:

Spotlight Session: Opportunities for Engagement with Iran
Best Practices for Expanding Participation in Study Abroad
Strategic Planning for Comprehensive Internationalization
Launch of Generation Study Abroad - an IIE Centennial Initiative
New Strategies for Global Engagement and Partnerships

View photos and videos and download conference presentations.

IIE also held a day of pre-conference roundtables on important current topics in international education on March 13. These sessions included discussions on:

Strategies to Better Integrate Chinese Students on U.S. Campuses
Strategies for Expanding Collaboration with Brazil
The Impact of Globalization on International Education
Facilitating International Research Collaboration
Donor Dialogue: The Role of the Donor in International Higher Education

Each session was moderated by an IIE representative, and included expert speakers on the topics and participants from all facets of the higher education community. See speakers lists and download roundtable presentations.

IIE's college and university partners play an important role in the work that the institute has done throughout its history to enable future leaders from all backgrounds and in all sectors to gain access to world-class education. The Best Practices Conference was sponsored by:

American Institute For Foreign Study (AIFS)
Education Division, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in New York
Educational Testing Service (ETS-TOEFL)
ELS Language Centers
Embassy of France
Terra Dotta
University of Southern California Rossier School of Education
Zinch, a Chegg Service

The work that the Institute does, together with the conference sponsors and all of our program sponsors and campus partners, to develop global leaders, internationalize higher education, and rescue threatened scholars encourages peace, prosperity, and scientific progress around the world.

Please join us once again in congratulating this year's IIE Andrew Heiskell Award winning campuses. We hope you will find valuable takeaways in their presentations and those of our keynote speakers and other expert panelists. Thank you to all who helped make this conference such a success.

Volunteer interpreter opportunities at the Center For New Americans

See attached flyer CNA Volunteer Flyer - Generic.pdf


Jane Vega
Employer Relations Coordinator
Career Services
Humphrey School of Public Affairs
University of Minnesota
301 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
t 612-624-1440
f 612-626-0002
http://www.hhh.umn.edu/career/

General Manager Camara Haiti

This is an exciting opportunity to build upon the Haiti Hub's foundation that began in 2013.

Position Title: General Manager Camara Haiti
Reporting to: European & Caribbean Service Centre Manager
Location: Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Background
Camara is an International organisation dedicated to using technology to improve education and provide livelihood skills in disadvantaged communities around the world.
Founded seven years ago in Ireland the organisation has built a proven model of 'education delivery' that is both sustainable and highly scalable. Camara has provided eLearning Centres to 2,500 schools in Africa, Ireland and the Caribbean - installed nearly 48,000 computers and trained over 12,000 teachers how to use the technology for learning purposes. Some 700,000 children in poor communities have been made digitally literate by us over this period
Camara adopts a social enterprise model that sells a wide range of products and services (reused computers, educational software, training programs, and technical support) to our Educational Hubs at heavily subsidised prices. The Hubs then sell the Camara package into the schools and provide aftermarket support.
Basic objective of the Role: This is an exciting opportunity to build upon the Haiti Hub's foundation that began in 2013. The General Manager will provide leadership and direction, coordinating all activities to establish and grow the Haiti Educational Hub's footprint and social impact.

Key Responsibilities
Management

Work in conjunction with the European & Caribbean Service Centre Manager to finalize Haiti's strategic plan, develop the Board of Directors, and establish the legal Hub entity.
Maintain effective financial management and reporting, and ensure annual targets are met at an operational level.
Develop and implement Hub policies that ensure effective governance and compliance with Camara's standards, and that meet all local regulatory requirements.
Implement customer-focussed programs that deliver Camara's educational solutions across Haiti as per agreed Memorandums of Understanding (MOU).
Recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff and volunteers.
Undertake other tasks as required.

Leadership

Proactively identify new funding opportunities and successfully negotiate eLearning Centre contracts that maximize social impact.
Build and maintain a high performance culture through effective performance management, communication and coaching of staff.
Provide clear leadership and promote the vision, values, and policies to protect Camara's integrity and reputation.
Align with and influence educational policy in Haiti.

Stakeholder Management

Develop and maintain mutually beneficial relationships with key government stakeholders, partners, and local and international donor organisations.
Leverage the greater Camara network to ensure the financial, social, and environmental sustainability of the Hub.
Promote Camara's vision and values both internally and externally.

Qualifications and Experience Required:

5+ years business (including management) experience (essential)
Experience managing projects and distributed teams in a challenging environment (essential)
Fluent in English, and either French or Creole (essential)
Experience working in a developing country (essential)
A Bachelor's or Master's Degree in Business, Education, International Development, or a related field (preferable)
Social Enterprise or Non-Profit Experience (preferable)
Logistics management experience (preferable)

Key Competencies
● Demonstrates passion and enthusiasm for Camara's vision, and motivates, leads, and empowers others to achieve organizational goals.
● Ability to establish and maintain positive working relationships with key stakeholders.
● Ability to formulate strategies and policies, and flexibly adapt to adverse situations.
● Demonstrated experience working within a social enterprise or non-profit environment.
● Has a personal commitment to organisational excellence; displays honesty, integrity, and a strong sense of ethics in all decision and actions.
● Demonstrated experience leading and motivating a team of staff and volunteers in successful goal achievement.
● Ability to analyse complex policy issues, draw conclusions and articulate clear and focused solutions.
● Demonstrates an in-depth knowledge of, and experience in, running a challenging, customer-focussed business.
● Is resilient; remains calm and deliberate under stressful conditions.
● Has the ability to organise resources to provide cost-effective solutions.
● Experience in working with Boards of Directors

To view the full job description, please click the link below http://www.candidatemanager.net/cm/micro/jobdetails.aspx?JID=UWUEVEVAZ&MID=YUDB&SID=BDEVU&a=8FwURhagEII%3d&b=LzTVlErPPyA%3d&Media=Irishjobs.ie

crossposted from IrishJobs.IE, forwarded by Dave Wilsey

Register now for China 100 event April 22, sessions on global agriculture & food safety, China business strategies & trends, health & med research, sustainability, & educ exchange

Minnesota and China: Global Agriculture and Food Safety

Panel discussion and question-and-answer session with experts in the fields of agriculture and food safety looking at current and future projects related to China. Panelists include Frank Liu, University of Minnesota Veterinary Medicine; Su Ye, Minnesota Department of Agriculture; Amy Kircher, National Center for Food Protection and Defense.

Dialogue between Business Leaders: China Business Strategies and Growth Trends

Facilitated discussion and question-and-answer session with representatives from Minnesota and China-based companies focused on doing business with and/or in China. Panelists include Kathleen Motzenbecker, Minnesota Trade Office; Sarena Lin, Cargill; Chris Lee, Medtronic Greater China; Simon Hu, Banner Engineering in Greater China; Robert Duan, Valspar Corporation.

PM2.5 Health Effects and Control

Presentation by University professor David Pui about a recent delegation of cross-disciplinary researchers working with Chinese scientists to find technological solutions to China's PM 2.5 air pollutant challenge. Panelists include David Pui, University of Minnesota Mechanical Engineering; Marshall Hertz, University of Minnesota Endoscopy and Pulmonary Rehabilitation; Gurumurthy Ramachandran, University of Minnesota School of Public Health; Tom Kuehn, University of Minnesota Mechanical Engineering.

Sustainability Efforts for China's Future

Panel discussion and question-and-answer session with experts about sustainability project collaborations between Minnesota and China in various disciplines including transportation and agriculture.Panelists include J,im Harkness, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy; Jason Cao, University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

Pioneers in Educational Exchange: How the University Established Meaningful Partnerships with China

Facilitated discussion taking a look at the rich history between the University of Minnesota and China. Panelists include Barbara Kappler, University of Minnesota International Student and Scholar Services; Wenda Moore, Former Chairman of the University of Minnesota Board of Regents; Ted Farmer, University of Minnesota Professor Emeritus, History.

Medical Research Collaboration Between Minnesota and China

Panel discussion and question-and-answer session with experts in the medical and health-related fields looking at the University's research partnerships in China and the impact of these studies. Panelists include Zigang Dong, University of Minnesota Hormel Institute; Kenneth Liao, University of Minnesota Medical School; Jen Jin, Mayo Clinic.

April 17, 2014 for "Leadership Lessons from the Front Lines of Global Business"

Carlson Global Institute
Leadership Lessons from the Front Lines of Global Business
Being successful in global business requires vision, strategy and leadership. Among all determinants of success in pursuing an international growth strategy, some believe that the factor that rises above all others is the quality and engagement of local leadership.

Shari Ballard, President of International and Chief Human Resources Officer for Best Buy, Inc., will explore the leadership imperative as it relates to doing business internationally. As a veteran of Best Buy, she will share her perspective on the key characteristics of leaders that impact the success of global initiatives.

Plan to join us to explore this important topic!

April 17, 2014
3:30-5:00 p.m. Presentation and Q & A
5:00-6:00 p.m. Networking Reception

3M Auditorium
Carlson School of Management (Map)
University of Minnesota
321 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Tickets are $35 (includes parking in University of Minnesota's 19th Avenue and 21st Avenue ramps).

Register Now http://www.eventbrite.com/e/global-matters-spring-2014-registration-9468046181


About the Speaker

Ms. Ballard joined Best Buy in 1993 as an assistant store manager in Flint, Michigan. She has risen through the ranks and in her current capacity is responsible for overseeing operations in China, Canada and Mexico.

Ballard is also responsible for global talent attractions, staffing and retention, leadership development, diversity, organizational design, employee education and development, compensation and benefits, and employee relations.

Ms. Ballard was named one of Fortune Magazine's 50 Most Powerful Women in Business. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan - Flint.

About Global Matters

Global Matters is a speaker series designed to enrich Minnesota professionals' global business acumen. The event features speakers at the forefront of global business who share their expertise in emerging issues in international business and management. The series is a platform for business, government, media and academic professionals engaged in global business to create and develop a valuable network.

Applying to the US Foreign Service? You might find this 2009 video useful

http://blog.lib.umn.edu/gpa/globalnotes/2011/02/applying-to-the-us-foreign-ser.php (see description below)

Humphrey students: Do also consult with Humphrey Diplomat-in-Residence Mary Curtin: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/gpa/globalnotes/2013/10/mary-curtin-appointed-humphrey.php

HHH Career Services and the Global Policy Area present: Traditions and Travails of the Foreign Service: Yesterday and Today William Davnie and Thomas Hanson.

Davnie and Hanson discuss the traditions of the Foreign Service from its founding to the current administration, as well as the historic travails in keeping a professional diplomatic service funded and staffed in the US. Changes in the Foreign Service under recent administrations, as well as plans for the expansion of the Foreign Service under the Obama Administration discussed. April 22, 2009.

William Davnie retired in 2007 after 26 years in the Foreign Service and having spent his final four months as Chief of Staff in the Office of Provincial Affairs, Embassy Baghdad, Iraq, working on the deployment of the "civilian surge". His posts include Thailand, Moscow, Tajikistan, Lithuania and Finland, and work in Washington, DC in intelligence analysis, counter-narcotics programs, and crisis management. He and his wife Charlotte moved to Minneapolis on his retirement. Thomas Hanson is a former career Foreign Service Officer. While with the U.S. Department of State his foreign postings included East Germany, France, Norway, the Soviet Union, Sweden, and Georgia. He also assisted in opening new embassies in Mongolia and Estonia.

Mr. Hanson has also worked on the Foreign Relations Committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Most recently, he was Director for NATO and European Affairs at the Atlantic Council of the United States in Washington, D.C. Currently he serves as Program Secretary of the St. Paul-Minneapolis Committee on Foreign Relations and as a lecturer/consultant for the Great Decisions program at the Minnesota International Center. He is an occasional foreign affairs commentator on Minnesota Public Radio. Mr. Hanson graduated from the University of Minnesota with a B.A. in International Relations.


HHH Prof. Atwood Brookings blog: "Global Partnership Ministerial in Mexico City"

http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/up-front/posts/2014/03/20-global-partnership-ministerial-mexico-city-atwood

There is a natural link between the post-2015 United Nations development goals process and the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation ministerial meeting that will take place in Mexico City, April 15-16. The efforts are complementary, but they are being pursued on separate tracks and with a different set of actors. Those attending the ministerial meeting in Mexico are charged directly with implementing the development agenda. They are ministers of development, planning or finance, and civil society and private sector representatives engaged in development cooperation. Their common purpose has had the effect of reducing the political tension that often accompanies other international meetings. Every effort should be made to transfer this intangible goodwill to the debate surrounding the post-2015 global development goals.
The UN Debate over Goals

The post-2015 development goals continue to be hotly debated by foreign ministry representatives in New York and in capitals around the world. Last year, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon set the stage for the debate by creating a high-level panel (HLP) of political leaders, including three heads of government who chaired the group. The HLP made what is thus far the most important contribution to the debate. The panel's diverse membership reaffirmed the contribution of the original eight Millennium Development Goals, improved and added to the list, and recommended a multi-layered approach that placed primary responsibility at the country level. The panel tackled the inequality issue by recommending that results measurement always include the lowest quadrant of the population. The report touched the most important of the bases, from poverty reduction to fragility to gender and the roles of civil society and the private sector.

The political challenge the HLP confronted was immense and predictably criticism was heard just after the report was made public. Some argued that despite the innovative proposal on inequality the issue was not given sufficient attention. Others wanted more comprehensive treatment of gender and environmental issues.

Still, what is remarkable is that a group of very diverse political leaders could achieve full consensus. Not only did they agree, they also performed the remarkable feat of writing a report that did not look like it was drafted by a committee.

This report could well be the high-water mark as the debate among the political factions of the United Nations continues unabated. In the words of one close observer, a lack of trust in New York is causing the debate to descend to a political tussle over poverty--"whose fault is it and who pays?"
The Role of Effectiveness and Accountability

Despite this contentious ideological debate conducted by officials whose knowledge of development cooperation is marginal, there remains cause for optimism. The universal goals for development created at the turn of the millennium have focused the development mission and created an important rationale for increased official development assistance (ODA). It would be difficult to imagine a world with no agreed-upon goals. Accountability in the development field is here to stay, and this is where the Global Partnership's effectiveness agenda has made its most important contribution.

This agenda was given a large boost by 162 governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector in Busan, Korea in 2011. The Global Partnership since then has been meeting in the form of a steering committee chaired by Nigerian Finance Minister N'Gozi Okonjo-Iweala, United Kingdom Secretary of State for Development Justine Greening and Indonesian Development Minister Armeda Alisjahbana. These leaders and a committee composed of developing country partners, traditional donors, new providers of "south-south" cooperation, civil society, parliamentarians and the private sector have done the planning for the Mexico ministerial.

The Mexico City meeting is part of a series that started in Rome in 2003. Subsequent meetings in Paris (2005), Accra (2008) and Busan (2011) created an ever-stronger set of principles related to the effectiveness of development interventions. As time has gone on, the donor profile at these meetings has receded as partner nations in the developing world began participating in large numbers and with growing intensity. They now fully embrace concepts initially conceived of in Paris in 2005, such as ownership, mutual accountability, transparency and results measurement. In Busan, the emerging economies (Brazil, China and India in particular)--new providers of assistance in the south-south context--came to the table and agreed on "shared principles." Civil society organized as never before and, along with representatives of the private sector, became more than just activists. They became active members of the negotiation team for the Busan outcome document.
Institutionalizing Trust

Trust is not an easy commodity to create on the international stage and it has taken over a decade of intense work to create the partnership that is the basis for the success of this forum. It would be premature to suggest that the Global Partnership has been permanently institutionalized, but the Mexico ministerial will be a good first test of that proposition.

There will be voices heard at the UN in New York from member state representatives reflecting foreign ministry views that the Global Partnership is not legitimate as it is not a UN institution. They are technically correct. The Global Partnership was originally conceived by those OECD donors who were members of the Development Assistance Committee. However, a concerted effort was made to overcome the legalities and to produce an entity that was widely accepted. the partnership's earlier meetings were planned by a working group made up of key partners, including the UN, the World Bank, partner countries, civil society, the private sector and developing country governments. In the end game leading to Busan, new providers such as Brazil, China and India participated in the drafting of the outcome document. The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) is now part of the secretariat for the Partnership. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon and UNDP Administrator Helen Clark were both in Busan and both are scheduled to be in Mexico City as well. The legitimacy issue has not thus far constrained participation in any way.
Ministerial Agenda Driven by Partner Countries

The planning for Mexico City has been ambitious and it reflects intense participation by developing country partners. Two of the plenary sessions--domestic resource mobilization and illicit flows--reflect a very healthy trend toward self-sufficiency and away from dependency. Tax revenues comprise a growing proportion of the economies of developing countries. The average tax revenue as a percentage of GDP for low income countries is 13 percent and for middle income countries 22 percent. In developmental states--states whose primary public policy thrust is development--domestic resource mobilization through efficient tax systems is increasing exponentially while ODA is decreasing as a percentage of GDP.

Recapturing illicit flows is a major objective of Nigerian Finance Minister N'Gozi Ojonko-Iweala, a cause she took up initially at the World Bank. In the very first meeting of the steering committee, she said that developing country resources sent by corrupt leaders to Western banks had been estimated at between $3 billion and $4 billion (recent studies indicate that the amount may be twice that). . Domestic banking laws are protecting these ill-gotten gains, and thus the effort to overcome these laws represents an important part of the policy coherence for development challenge. Some progress has been made in tracking these illicit funds, but gaining the release of these resources would compensate in some small part for the reductions in ODA we have seen in the past three years.

The Mexican government has promoted a session on the particular challenges faced by middle-income countries where poverty remains prevalent. ODA flows to these countries have decreased, but poverty and inequality persist. Many of these governments are both providers and recipients of ODA. While they are increasingly accepting a development-cooperation responsibility, particularly in their region, they remain reluctant to further define their specific responsibilities and understandably concerned that calling attention to their provider role will create internal political issues. They are looking for explicit partnerships with donors that will enable an effective effort to reduce poverty at home.
Working Together Across Old Boundaries

Sessions on the increasing number of triangular projects involving traditional donors, new providers and partner countries reflect a willingness to work beyond the old north-south boundaries. "Knowledge sharing," a key aspect of an increasingly sophisticated definition of the south-south model, will also be a central topic for the agenda. The ministerial will focus, as did the UN High Level Panel, on "inclusive development," possibly presenting a new "Framework for Inclusive Development Partnerships" that involves governments at all levels, civil society, the private sector and donors.

These topics reflect the interests and the commitments of partner countries to the Global Partnership. It is this intense participation by the low and middle-income governments that has made participation by the so-called "new providers"--the China, India, Brazil, and others like them--so attractive. This is a forum where traditional donors, new providers and partner countries can discuss their programs, policies and approaches in a non-threatening environment. These countries participate actively not because OECD donors ask them to, but rather because their south-south partners want them there. In this regard, the leadership being shown by Mexico as the host country is vitally important.
Monitoring: The Essential Accountability Tool

One of the most compelling aspects of the ministerial will be the presentation of a monitoring survey that will show evidence of countries' progress or failure to meet obligations undertaken in the Busan outcome document. This survey has involved about 50 developing governments and the traditional donors, both bilateral and multilateral. The presentation of this survey will provide a platform to call for accelerated progress, a higher level of ambition or for action to overcome bottlenecks where they exist. It will also credit donors who have shown real leadership in both the quantity and the quality of the assistance they provide.

This type of survey is an essential accountability tool. The Busan outcome document represents a voluntary commitment, often called a "soft-law" approach. The only way to assure compliance is to publically shame those who have shirked their responsibilities. And as most of the specific commitments were undertaken at Busan by the traditional donors, a willingness to participate in a survey that could expose deficiencies builds trust among the other partners. That is, of course, if those deficiencies are not too prominent. Certainly, donors will hear many concerns about reductions in the overall amount of ODA.

A very explicit "Guide to the Monitoring Framework of the Global Partnership" has been promulgated by the secretariat and each of the indicators and targets is described in detail. According to those involved in the planning, there will be an effort to extrapolate from the findings and to incorporate evidence related to "inclusive development partnerships," "results," "transparency and accountability," "country ownership" and "fragility and conflict" in the outcome document.
Private Sector Dialogue

Mexico City will also see a major push to confirm the private sector as a partner in development. The premise for this important consensus was built at Busan where over 45 business associations participated to express their willingness to create a new partnership with development agencies and partner governments. Developing nations embraced this initiative. The purpose of this agenda in Mexico will be to break down the silos further to enhance the dialogue among governments, businesses and civil society. This will hopefully lead to further innovations in financing investment, particularly in low-income countries where the risk is highest.
Creating an Even Better Partnership

Lastly, the steering committee chairs will present their ideas for strengthening the relationship between the committee and the key constituencies that make up the partnership. The committee now has 18 members, but there is concern that key constituencies are left out. There is a tentative agreement to expand membership to 24, which will allow positions for Arab donors, another African member and a labor union representative. The three co-chairs will step aside and there seems to be interest in assuring that at least one be replaced by a representative of the next host country. Korea has offered to hold a meeting of an expanded committee each year between ministerials. This will in itself improve communications. The steering committee will be expected to exercise more substantive leadership and to concern itself less with process, a matter better left to the secretariat. What is encouraging is that this discussion goes to the heart of the institutionalization of the Global Partnership.

It was my hope that when the Global Partnership was created it would become the central institution among all others in the development community. The global development challenge will require better coordination among all the constituencies and this forum more than any other has the potential to play that role. There is also a need to strengthen the capacity of the UNDP and OECD secretariat and resources will be needed for that.

Let us hope that the Mexico City ministerial will live up to our aspirations. If it does, it will not only institutionalize a vitally important global forum, it also will positively influence the UN effort to conceive and endorse development goals for 2015 and beyond.


J. Brian Atwood
Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development
J. Brian Atwood is a nonresident senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development program and chair of Global Policy Studies and professor of Public Policy at the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota.

Reprinted from Brookings UpFront

J. Brian Atwood | March 20, 2014 12:14pm
Global Partnership Ministerial in Mexico City

April 10 Florence & Baghdad: Renaissance Art & Arab Science

Center for Early Modern History University of Minnesota invites you to participate in

A discussion of Florence and Baghdad: Renaissance Art and Arab Science, Hans Belting (Belknap, 2011)

Thursday, April 10, 2014 12:15 pm, 1210 Heller Hall

In conjunction with the Interdisciplinary Graduate-Faculty Symposium: "Picturing Nature, Naturalizing Pictures" and the Critical Science Studies Collaborative

A light lunch will be provided. Please feel free to circulate this invitation.

Elliott Abrams speaking at Humphrey School Apr 2

"WHAT HAPPENED TO THE ARAB SPRING?" will be presented by Elliott Abrams, former White House official and senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies with the Council on Foreign Relations. Abrams will consider events in the Middle East since 2012 and discuss implications for U.S. policy. Apr. 2, 7 p.m., Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School.

For registration (free) and more information, see Arab Spring http://www.eventbrite.com/e/elliott-abrams-what-happened-to-the-arab-spring-tickets-10875403625

USAID is Hiring Education Foreign Service Officers

USAID is looking for dynamic, committed education development professionals who want to make a difference in the lives of millions across the globe. We are an independent federal agency with a long history of extending a helping hand to people overseas struggling to make a better life, recovering from a disaster, or striving to live in a free and democratic country.

Apply here: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/363671600

Questions about the announcement should be directed to careerconnectorhelp(at)treasury.gov.

The announcement will remain open until Monday, April 7, 2014.

forwarded by HHH Diplomat-in-Residence Mary Curtin

German Chancellor Fellowship

The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation's German Chancellor Fellowship Program is for university graduates from the United States, the Russian Federation, the People's Republic of China, Brazil and India with an interest in international issues and demonstrated leadership potential. The program is targeted at accomplished young professionals who are likely to become decision-makers, thought leaders, and influential voices in their respective fields. Fellows will be recruited from a broad range of areas such as politics and public policy, law, media, business, the non-governmental sector, and the arts. The program provides fellows the opportunity to spend one year in Germany, where they will network with other prospective leaders from abroad and explore new solutions to the global issues of our times. This prestigious program builds on Germany's established and growing reputation as a favored destination for problem-focused international dialogue and a meeting place for tomorrow's international leaders.

During their time in Germany, Federal Chancellor Fellows conduct independent projects at their host institutions. The project should involve original exploration of a topic or issue, or research in the fellow's respective field of interest. The fellows are mentored by hosts in Germany, whom the fellows have chosen on the basis of their expertise in their respective areas. Projects should be of relevance to modern societies, have a long-term and visible impact, and help to advance fellows' careers and professional development. Through their experience in Germany, fellows will acquire greater knowledge of their fields, gain new international experience, and strengthen their intercultural competence - all essential qualities for future professional leaders.

Eligibility:
Bachelor's or comparable academic degree, completed less than twelve years prior to the starting date of the fellowship (October 1 of the year following application)
Citizenship of the United States, the Russian Federation, the People's Republic of China, the Federative Republic of Brazil or the Republic of India
Candidates from all professions and disciplines are eligible to apply
Demonstrated leadership potential; applicants whose background is largely academic should also have gained some leadership experience beyond their own research activities
Either English or German language skills
Application:
A project plan (approx. 3 pages)
A detailed host's statement, including a confirmation of support
Two letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to comment on the candidate's professional, personal, and/or academic background
New application deadline: September 15
Register for the next round of applications online
It is considered a prestigious fellowship and the alumni of the program typically have gone on to very successful careers.

Additional program information, frequently asked questions, and a brochure on recent AvH German Chancellor Fellows can be found on the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation's website.

Questions? Contact the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation or the American Friends office.
Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
Jean-Paul-Str. 12
53173 Bonn, GERMANY
T: (+49) 0228-833-0
F: (+49) 0228-833-199
E: info(at)avh.de
www.humboldt-foundation.de

forwarded by Prof. Robert Kudrle

Apr 22 China 100 Symposium: U, Minnesota, & China looking forward to the next century

Register Now!

Tuesday, April 22, 2014 1:00-4:00 p.m. followed by a social hour
McNamara Alumni Center Twin Cities Campus

The China 100 Symposium will acknowledge our history and also look forward to the next 100 years. It will include:

Showcase of the China 100 History Exhibit: 100 Years of Engagement
Breakout sessions featuring experts in various fields
Social hour for continued discussions and networking
Download the detailed schedule (PDF) http://china100.umn.edu/forms/en/symposium/lib/img/China100_Symposium_Schedule_March2014.pdf

Registration begins at 12:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. http://china100.umn.edu/forms/en/symposium/

About China 100
China 100 is a yearlong celebration honoring the first students from China and the wealth of connections that have come since. This celebration honors the past and takes a look forward at the engagement between the University of Minnesota and China. Learn more online at china100.umn.edu.

Sponsor China 100
Be a part of history. Your contribution to China 100 ensures that you become a part of an ever-growing collection of U.S.-China history at the University of Minnesota. Several sponsorship options are available. Contact Joan Brzezinski at brzez001(at)umn.edu for more information.

For more information, please visit the China 100 website.
Contact the China Center at 612-624-1002 or chinactr(at)umn.edu.

China100 lecture by Dr. Patrick Mendis, HHH alum, March 27

Greetings from the China Center! We thought you might be interested in attending a lecture by Dr. Patrick Mendis about his latest book "Peaceful War" in University International Center Room 101 on March 27, 2014 from 12-1pm.

Dr. Mendis, a U of M alumnus, will extrapolate on the American-Chinese relationship with a fiscal, historical and geo-political lens in a lecture titled "American Vision, Chinese Mission and the Lake Woebegone."

A light lunch and beverages will be provided.

Here's the link to RSVP; the flyer attached contains all relevant information about the lecture.

http://www.china100.umn.edu/events/index.html


Chelsea Keeney
University of Minnesota - China Center
160 University International Center
331 17th Avenue S.E.
Minneapolis, MN 55414
Tel: 612-624-1002
Fax: 612-625-0045
www.chinacenter.umn.edu

Monday, Mar 31 Yossi Beilin speaking on the Israeli-Palestinian process

THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PROCESS and the Dynamics of a Region in Turmoil
Yossi Beilin, Israeli Statesman, Scholar, and Peace Activist

Monday, March 31, 2014 12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Wilkins Room (215), Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to join us for a lunch with Yossi Beilin, former Member of Knesset, whose visit to Minnesota has been sponsored by the organization J Street, as part of its 2 Campaign, designed to convey support to the Obama Administration in its effort to pursue a negotiated peace.

Dr. Yossi Beilin is a former Member of Knesset, where he served for the Labor Party from 1988 through 2003, and for Meretz, which he chaired from 2004 through 2008. Beginning in the mid-1980s, Beilin held various ministerial positions in the Israeli government, including Minister of Justice. During his tenure as Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr. Beilin initiated the effort that resulted in the 1993 Oslo Accords. In 1994, he initiated the process that led to the launch of the Birthright program. Together with Palestinian minister Yasser Abed Rabbo, Dr. Beilin launched the track two Geneva Initiative in 2003, articulating a possible structure of a permanent agreement between Israel and an independent Palestinian state. He has published numerous books on the peace process and Israeli politics and policy, and has a Ph.D. from the University of Tel Aviv, where he taught courses in Political Science for 13 years. Dr. Beilin is currently the president of Beilink, a business consulting firm that he founded in 2008.

Space is limited, register at https://YossiBeilin.eventbrite.com

US Dept of State Pathways Internships (IEP/ITEP) Open Now

We are accepting applications for the U.S. Department of State Pathways Internship Experience Program (IEP) and the Internship Temporary Experience Program (ITEP).

Visit USAJobs to start the online application process and search for the following vacancy announcement numbers.Please note the cutoff number for each position. Applications received after the cutoff number is reached will not be reviewed. Therefore, timely submission of applications is important.

IEP Grade Location Cutoff Announcement Number
GS-199 Intelligence Research 7 Washington, DC 50 HRSC/PATH-2014-0069
GS-2299 IT Specialist 5,7
Washington, DC 100 HRSC/PATH-2014-0066
ITEP Grade Location Cutoff Announcement Number
GS-1099 Public Affairs 5 Washington, DC 50 HRSC/PATH-2014-0065
The Internship Experience Program (IEP) allows for non-temporary appointments that are expected to last the length of the academic program for which the intern is enrolled. IEP participants, while in the program, are eligible for noncompetitive promotions.

The Internship Temporary Experience Program (ITEP) places interns on temporary appointments not to exceed one year with the possibility of extensions in one-year increments. The temporary nature of ITEP allows for interns to work during seasonal and holiday breaks in academic programs. ITEP participants are ineligible for noncompetitive promotions. If an ITEP participant is qualified at a higher grade level, he/she must compete for the position via a USAJobs vacancy announcement.

Both programs allow for noncompetitive conversion into the competitive service following successful completion of all program requirements. Veteran's preference applies.

Pathways internship opportunities with the U.S. Department of State allow students to witness and participate in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy, and work closely with the U.S. diplomats and civil servants who carry out America's foreign policy initiatives.

We appreciate your interest in a career with the U.S. Department of State.

Visit our forums if you have any questions, or to search for topics of interest. The forums can be found under Engage on the careers.state.gov website. You can also search our FAQs for more information.

U.S. citizenship is required. An equal opportunity employer.

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